Friday, July 8, 2011

"Jerome and the Seraph" by Robina Williams Book Review




Genre: Christian Speculative
Recommendation: Good

Originality – 5/5
Writing Style – 5/5
Plot – 3/5
Characters – 5/5
Aesthetics – 4/5

Brother Jerome is dead. So now what should he do?
Robina Williams’ Quantum Cat series, of which Jerome and the Seraph is first, revolves around a group of friars and their pet cat, Leo, living in the English countryside. When one of the friars dies, however, he finds himself in an afterworld that he never expected and must now rely on his old feline companion to help him navigate his way around the afterlife.
Meanwhile, the rest of the brothers become rather concerned about the head of their local friary, Father Fidelis. Some surmise that the priest is terminally ill. Others believe he’s having an affair with the new woman who’s moved into town.
Blending mystery, humor, and a wee bit of heresy, Robina delivers a very pleasant read in Jerome and the Seraph. The plot may seem a bit slow to some, but remember, life in the friary isn’t supposed to be fast.
More conservative readers should note that the characters do take the Lord’s name in vain and use mild curse words to a limited extent. There is also a Christianized reference to the mythological gods. Finally, as Brother Jerome discovers, the afterlife described in this book may not be the Heaven that you would expect.
Overall, I give Jerome and the Seraph a recommendation of Good and will look forward to reading the rest of Robina Williams’ Quantum Cat series, Angelos and Gaea.
Jerome and the Seraph is available from Twilight Times Books.

"Angelos" by Robina Williams Book Review


Genre: Christian Speculative
Recommendation: Good

Originality – 5/5
Writing Style – 5/5
Plot – 4/5
Characters – 5/5
Aesthetics – 5/5

There’s a new Guardian in town…and the friars aren’t going to like it.
Also, the deceased Brother Jerome gets “teleported” to a new town and he isn’t going to like it much either.
Angelos, book two in Robina Williams’ Quantum Cat series, finds Father Fidelis being transferred to a new assignment and a new troubled priest taking up the reigns of the friary. The new guardian, Father Aidan, has been feeling distant from God lately as he experiences what has classically been referred to as “that dark night of the soul.” What will he do to keep himself and his fellow monks on the right path? Will he be able to find God’s presence again?
Meanwhile, Brother Jerome, the dead friar who occasionally stops back in at the friary for a visit around his old home or a chat with friends, finds himself suddenly whisked away to a dark maze of concrete tunnels, filled with dead men’s bones. He is in the lair of the Minotaur! And, equally unhappy at his change in location, the Minotaur finds himself waking up in the friary’s shed.
Robina spins humor, sensitivity, deep spiritual insight, and a Christianized version of classical mythology into this amusing and thought-provoking exploration of the inner and outer spiritual realms.
(There is some use of taking the Lord’s name in vain and some mild cursing.)
Overall, I give Angelos a strong recommendation of Good. The Quantum Cat series starts with Jerome and the Seraph and follows Angelos with the third book, Gaea.
Angelos is available from Twilight Times Books.

"Gaea" by Robina Williams Book Review


Genre: Christian Speculative
Recommendation: Good

Originality – 5/5
Writing Style – 5/5
Plot – 2/5
Characters – 5/5
Aesthetics – 4/5

Amazing! Playfully imaginative!
Gaea takes the gods and goddesses of myth and brings them under the creation and dominion of the one, true God.
Gaea, the earth goddess, Mother Nature herself, is frustrated with humankind’s wanton use of the earth’s natural resources and utter disregard for the other creatures of this world. She wants to punish the humans for not respecting creation as they should and begins visiting other deities, asking for their help in her campaign against humankind. The question is, how far will God let her go? And will humans ever really change their ways?
Gaea is both humorous and spiritually insightful. Robina Williams shows us a great picture of God and provides a strong presentation of the Gospel message.
The one problem I found with the book was its slow-moving plot. The narration becomes very repetitive as we are told over and over again how Gaea feels versus how God feels. Many of the conversations and scenes continue well beyond the point of providing new information.
Overall, I give Gaea a recommendation of Good and will look forward to reading the rest of Robina Williams’ Quantum Cat series, of which Gaea is the third.
Gaea is available from Twilight Times Books.

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